Coppelion: [Episode 2]


I'm an anime/manga junkie, yaoi lover and hopeless romantic. Full Metal Alchemist: Brotherhood is the best. That is all.

You may also like...

2 Responses

  1. lifesongsoa says:

    I wasn’t really sure what direction this second episode was going for. It felt like it was just a story about stupid people writing their own tragedy. My own interpretation is that this was just another attempt to humanize the three super powered school girls, the problem is that they already feel like the most real and human thing in Coppelion so it just felt heavy handed instead.

    The thing with the dad was just… Maybe he was dying anyway? They did say that normal humans couldn’t survive in that spot. I am just intentionally turning my brain off for that one.

    I kind of felt like both parents were killed off because they were bad people who had no future anyway. That is possibly just me reading too much into it however. It’s hard to believe that anyone would remember their past if they just left the city on their own. I can’t help feeling like some moral implication from the original writer went over my head with this episode.

  2. charlmeister says:

    I guess what they were trying to do was to show the contrast between human emotions to what an android is made to feel. But the thing with that was, was that it felt too forced and fake from both Mitsuo and Yukiko (which made me annoyed with their characters), whereas with Coppelion, I felt a lot of sympathy for them.

    Maybe so, but the Vice President was there, I’m positive they had the treatment necessary to at least cure him because they saved Miku. But he was in that open area too long so probably.

    “The ghosts of a person’s past always come back to haunt them”?? Or maybe one will try to do things right in the present to make up for the wrongs done in the past. I can only think of those two. I’d have liked to know what crime Mitsuo had committed in the past. It only seems that he made the choice to die because Miku would have been a constant reminder of what he had done, so he just left her with someone more capable of taking care of her.